CO2 injected in deep subsurface environments likely causes shifts in the microbial community and could improve overall efficiency of CO2...
A new study reveals novel insights into enzymes important for genome stability and gene regulation related to plant development that could enhance...
Two studies looked at sources of variation among climate-carbon models to more precisely project changes in the carbon cycle and predict long-term...
Steam reforming is a method for converting biomass-derived light hydrocarbons and aromatics into a mixture of carbon monoxide and hydrogen that can...
Climate change is expected to cause oxygen-minimum zones (OMZs) in the ocean to expand and intensify. This study examines potential effects on...
Researchers answering fundamental scientific questions in biology, climate and chemistry look to high performance computing and robust software....

Welcome to EMSL

Science Themes

Molecular-scale understanding of key chemical and physical properties of aerosols to accurately predict regional air quality and climate.
Optimizing and understanding the responses of organisms and biological communities to their environment.
Understanding the physical and chemical properties of interfaces to design new materials for energy applications.
Understanding molecular processes in terrestrial and subsurface environments.

Featured Stories

Alex Guenther, EMSL’s Atmospheric Aerosol Systems Science Theme lead and a PNNL Laboratory Fellow, is impacting the atmospheric science community and has the science and journal citations to prove it.
ASTM International has selected EMSL’s Don Baer to receive the 2014 Award of Merit, the organization's highest recognition. He earned the award the for his exceptional service to ASTM International Committee E42 on Surface Analysis, innovations in the development of standards for surface analysis and development of new information resources for surface analysis.
Arctic clouds are widespread and play an important role in climate, but different models have produced widely varying predictions about the properties of these clouds. A new study analyzes simulations of Arctic clouds by 11 different models and identifies the key factor responsible for the variable predictions.
A new study combines modeling and laboratory experiments to assess uranium release under flow conditions over a time period long enough to evaluate transport behavior of uranium in sediment samples collected from the Hanford Site.

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