Lithium (Li) metal has long been considered one of the most attractive anode materials, but large-scale application of high-energy rechargeable Li...
This study presents a unified multiscale model that uses a single set of equations to simultaneously simulate hydrological processes in an ecosystem...
This study revealed the structure and function of a complex cellulose-degrading microbial community, which could lead to greater use of plant...
By providing critical guidance on coating designs for improving the performance of silicon anodes, these findings could enable the development of...
By providing a more complete understanding of the chemical nature of soot particles, this research could ultimately lead to improved climate model...
EMSL’s call for fiscal year 2016 proposals opened Jan. 7 and offers two opportunities for submitting research projects: Science Theme Research and...

Welcome to EMSL

Science Themes

Molecular-scale understanding of key chemical and physical properties of aerosols to accurately predict regional air quality and climate.
Optimizing and understanding the responses of organisms and biological communities to their environment.
Understanding the physical and chemical properties of interfaces to design new materials for energy applications.
Understanding molecular processes in terrestrial and subsurface environments.

Featured Stories

EMSL- and DOE-supported research on the formation and lifecycle secondary organic aerosols shows current climate models are underestimating the total amount of carbon-containing particles formed in the air.
Chemists have unexpectedly made two differently colored crystals – one orange, the other blue – from one chemical in the same flask while studying a special kind of molecular connection called an agostic bond. EMSL's supercomputer Chinook was used to perform theoretical calculations on the crystalline structures. The researchers were studying agostic bonds as part of a project to make liquid fuels from carbon dioxide to replace fuels from oil. Read the PNNL news release.
A team of PNNL scientists doing some of their research at EMSL developed a unified theory and unified multiscale model that simulates water flow at all scales. The new approach is important for understanding water cycling and its effect on agriculture, water conservation and climate changes.
Reduction-oxidation, or "redox," regulation is essential for many biological processes. Using a commercially available resin, PNNL researchers working at EMSL developed an innovative, efficient method for enriching and quantitatively analyzing several post-translational modifications of cysteine residues.

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