C02 injected in deep subsurface environments likely causes shifts in the microbial community and could improve overall efficiency of C02...
A new study reveals novel insights into enzymes important for genome stability and gene regulation related to plant development that could enhance...
Two studies looked at sources of variation among climate-carbon models to more precisely project changes in the carbon cycle and predict long-term...
Steam reforming is a method for converting biomass-derived light hydrocarbons and aromatics into a mixture of carbon monoxide and hydrogen that can...
Climate change is expected to cause oxygen-minimum zones (OMZs) in the ocean to expand and intensify. This study examines potential effects on...
Researchers answering fundamental scientific questions in biology, climate and chemistry look to high performance computing and robust software....

Welcome to EMSL

Science Themes

Molecular-scale understanding of key chemical and physical properties of aerosols to accurately predict regional air quality and climate.
Optimizing and understanding the responses of organisms and biological communities to their environment.
Understanding the physical and chemical properties of interfaces to design new materials for energy applications.
Understanding molecular processes in terrestrial and subsurface environments.

Featured Stories

Findings from a team of scientists doing some of their research at EMSL showed plants emit a molecular signal that invites an attack from a pathogen. The results were published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences and could lead to advances in biofuels and human health.
EMSL- and DOE-supported research on the formation and lifecycle secondary organic aerosols shows current climate models are underestimating the total amount of carbon-containing particles formed in the air.
EMSL’s high-performance computing team developed a process to manage the setup of the new Cascade supercomputer, that process was featured in the cover story of the April 2014 LINUX Journal.
EMSL scientists Patrick Reardon and Karl Mueller studied the protein structures that make up nanowires on some bacteria. These tiny electrical wires contribute to rock and dirt formation. Their findings have implications for producing energy, recycling Earth's carbon and miniaturizing computers.

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