Steam reforming is a method for converting biomass-derived light hydrocarbons and aromatics into a mixture of carbon monoxide and hydrogen that can...
Climate change is expected to cause oxygen-minimum zones (OMZs) in the ocean to expand and intensify. This study examines potential effects on...
Understanding how water and chemicals flow in soils is important for many practical problems such as assessing the risk of groundwater contamination...
Understanding the formation of ice crystals in the atmosphere could improve the accuracy of climate models. A new study with Stony Brook University...
Technetium-99 is a common radioactive contaminant in groundwater at nuclear waste reprocessing sites. This study examines ways iron and sulfide...
Lyle Gordon and Abigail Ferrieri are recipients of 2014 William R. Wiley Distinguished Postdoctoral Fellowships. This is only the second time two...

Welcome to EMSL

Science Themes

Molecular-scale understanding of key chemical and physical properties of aerosols to accurately predict regional air quality and climate.
Optimizing and understanding the responses of organisms and biological communities to their environment.
Understanding the physical and chemical properties of interfaces to design new materials for energy applications.
Understanding molecular processes in terrestrial and subsurface environments.

Featured Stories

Arctic clouds are widespread and play an important role in climate, but different models have produced widely varying predictions about the properties of these clouds. A new study analyzes simulations of Arctic clouds by 11 different models and identifies the key factor responsible for the variable predictions.
Virtually tour EMSL's Radiochemistry Annex, a facility designed for the understanding of the chemical fate and transport of radionuclides in terrestrial and subsurface ecosystems.
Chemists have unexpectedly made two differently colored crystals – one orange, the other blue – from one chemical in the same flask while studying a special kind of molecular connection called an agostic bond. EMSL's supercomputer Chinook was used to perform theoretical calculations on the crystalline structures. The researchers were studying agostic bonds as part of a project to make liquid fuels from carbon dioxide to replace fuels from oil. Read the PNNL news release.
EMSL’s high-performance computing team developed a process to manage the setup of the new Cascade supercomputer, that process was featured in the cover story of the April 2014 LINUX Journal.

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