Steam reforming is a method for converting biomass-derived light hydrocarbons and aromatics into a mixture of carbon monoxide and hydrogen that can...
Climate change is expected to cause oxygen-minimum zones (OMZs) in the ocean to expand and intensify. This study examines potential effects on...
Understanding how water and chemicals flow in soils is important for many practical problems such as assessing the risk of groundwater contamination...
Understanding the formation of ice crystals in the atmosphere could improve the accuracy of climate models. A new study with Stony Brook University...
Technetium-99 is a common radioactive contaminant in groundwater at nuclear waste reprocessing sites. This study examines ways iron and sulfide...
The DOE Joint Genome Institute and EMSL have approved a dozen projects submitted for the call for Collaborative Science Initiative proposals. These ...

Welcome to EMSL

Science Themes

Molecular-scale understanding of key chemical and physical properties of aerosols to accurately predict regional air quality and climate.
Optimizing and understanding the responses of organisms and biological communities to their environment.
Understanding the physical and chemical properties of interfaces to design new materials for energy applications.
Understanding molecular processes in terrestrial and subsurface environments.

Featured Stories

The votes are in, and the Society for Industrial Microbiology and Biotechnology membership has elected EMSL Science Theme Lead Scott Baker as the president-elect starting in July. He will be the organizations’ president beginning July 2015. SIMB is a nonprofit, international association dedicated to the advancement of microbiological sciences.
Reduction-oxidation, or "redox," regulation is essential for many biological processes. Using a commercially available resin, PNNL researchers working at EMSL developed an innovative, efficient method for enriching and quantitatively analyzing several post-translational modifications of cysteine residues.
Chief Scientist Nancy Hess recently answered questions about EMSL’s Radiochemistry Annex and its importance to the understanding of the chemical fate and transport of radionuclides in terrestrial and subsurface ecosystems.
The effects of biogeochemical and geochemical processes in the ground under us are on massive scales. Scientists working at EMSL are getting a handle on these gigantic macroscopic processes by focusing on the microscopic scale. By creating micromodels and incorporating supercomputer simulations, researchers are gaining a better understanding of the processes that affect our entire ecosystem.

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