A recent proteomics study sheds light on metal reduction pathways in key microbial species, paving the way for future widespread use for...
A study examining the effect of relative humidity on evaporation kinetics of secondary organic aerosol particles provides fundamental information...
Researchers identified a novel cyanobacterial strain that grows rapidly and is amenable to genetic manipulation—qualities that make this organism...
Lithium (Li) metal has long been considered one of the most attractive anode materials, but large-scale application of high-energy rechargeable Li...
This study presents a unified multiscale model that uses a single set of equations to simultaneously simulate hydrological processes in an ecosystem...
If you’re interested in submitting a letter of intent or learning more about the DOE JGI-EMSL Collaborative Science Initiative Call for Proposals,...

Welcome to EMSL

Science Themes

Molecular-scale understanding of key chemical and physical properties of aerosols to accurately predict regional air quality and climate.
Optimizing and understanding the responses of organisms and biological communities to their environment.
Understanding the physical and chemical properties of interfaces to design new materials for energy applications.
Understanding molecular processes in terrestrial and subsurface environments.

Featured Stories

The votes are in, and the Society for Industrial Microbiology and Biotechnology membership has elected EMSL Science Theme Lead Scott Baker as the president-elect starting in July. He will be the organizations’ president beginning July 2015. SIMB is a nonprofit, international association dedicated to the advancement of microbiological sciences.
Reduction-oxidation, or "redox," regulation is essential for many biological processes. Using a commercially available resin, PNNL researchers working at EMSL developed an innovative, efficient method for enriching and quantitatively analyzing several post-translational modifications of cysteine residues.
Findings from a team of scientists doing some of their research at EMSL showed plants emit a molecular signal that invites an attack from a pathogen. The results were published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences and could lead to advances in biofuels and human health.
Chief Scientist Nancy Hess recently answered questions about EMSL’s Radiochemistry Annex and its importance to the understanding of the chemical fate and transport of radionuclides in terrestrial and subsurface ecosystems.

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